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My Book!!!! — Perhaps yes, perhaps no. Exactly? I don’t know.

A story which you cant ignore to read….its mesmirizing, hillarious, heart wrenching, heart warming and …..”add your thoughts after reading it” 🙂

 

Guys, Around a year ago I completed a book; Sinan and Leyla. It took me a LONG time to write. It is a muslim love story; I guess you could say. Though the focus of religion is pretty minimal. I wanted more than anything to publish it but at a loss where to start; I […]

via My Book!!!! — Perhaps yes, perhaps no. Exactly? I don’t know.

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Report- 2015’s U.S Bombings On Muslim Countries

The Human Lens

US-Bombs-Dropped-in-2015-300x184

Recently I came across the work of Mr. Micah Zenko a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR). Mr. Zenko has extensive background of working with  Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government, Brookings Institution Washington, DC, Congressional Research Service, and State Department’s Office of Policy Planning.

A fierce critic of American policies on wars, he recently documented the number of bombings the United States of American has dropped on other countries and as expected the figures are gruesome. According to his estimates, since Jan. 1, 2015, the U.S. has dropped around 23,144 bombs on Iraq, Syria, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Yemen, and Somalia, all countries that are majority Muslim.

Here we see the charts provided by  the pro-State Department’s think-tank  that clearly highlight the level of destruction the U.S has leveled on other countries. It wouldn’t be wrong to say that a rogue nation like U.S.A has no qualms in going around justifying…

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Drugs! Are they worth it?

mylittlebreathingspace - Ismail Satia

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IntifadaKashmir|Stand For Kashmir, Stand For Humanity

The Human Lens

PalestineKashmir

My heart quivers like a wounded sparrow,
as I utter your three-syllabic name
under my native breath

In cold winter nights,
when my sanctuary was invaded,
your cities, burning, ascended to heavens

Your lush olives and dreams when torn asunder,
our apple orchards and maples—captive,
howled too

Beyond fortified towers of meaning,
an unintelligible stutter of longing
made borders porous,

Palestine, Kashmir
KashmirPalestine
PalesKashTineMir—

monozygotic twins of our
mother freedom,
rocking us in history’s cradle

As a four-year-old,
I learnt to sing you like a rhyme
in unison with my country’s name

My mother treasured your olives
a keepsake of the Blessed Land—
a relic I never touched.

How does one count yearning?
Decades, epochs,
eons?

What traverses when an hour passes,
or a minute-hand moves?
Metrology is laughable

but memory isn’t:
like of a child’s shoe, her only trace
found under the rubble of her bombed home

Weaving…

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Yemen’s Nawal Al Maghafi Reminds World Of The Forgotten War

The Human Lens

Earlier this week, on The Human Lens I wrote about the horrifying war in Yemen and how the world’s indifference continues while civilians are being bombed and butchered by the war participants. Today I bring you a round-up of the latest events in the war-torn country by an award-winning journalist and filmmaker whose work has been featured across international media.

There are no words to describe this young woman; Nawal Al Maghafi and her courage, determination and resourcefulness in bringing to this world the news about a war that needs world attention.  In 2011, she had her first meeting with Ali Al Imad and the Houthi leaders in Sa’adah Yemen. Bravely, she traveled incognito with a 13-year old Houthi guide, complete with AK47, her filming equipment hidden beneath her traditional Yemeni clothing, gathering the testimonies of many families who had lost their relatives in the escalating conflict.

Click on this video…

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The Holy Women of Pakistan

The Human Lens

“But the practice, is frowned upon by almost all religious scholars and much of mainstream Islam, is generally practiced in secret,” says a local cleric. Further he adds, “Islamic rights on women’s share in property are very clear; but reflecting upon the issue of Quran marriages, it is appalling that in the 21st century such out-dated customs still prevail.”

The tradition of “Haq Bakshish” most common in province of Sindh, but also followed in Southern parts of Punjab province, is most often practiced by the feudal families, often `Syeds’. The Syeds consider themselves upper caste Muslims families are often reluctant to allow their women to marry into non-Syed families, in a kind of caste system that sees such families as being lower in status.

These Syeds claim to be the descendents of Muhammad and regard themselves are pure-blooded “Muslims”. That is if any such thing exists. There is…

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